Highlights from SC&RA Annual Conference 2017

We recently had the opportunity to attend the 2017 Specialized Carriers and Rigging Association (SC&RA) Annual Conference, joining 750 other participants from across the globe to meet, learn and celebrate our industry.

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The SC&RA helps members do businesses safer and more efficiently, by monitoring and affecting pending legislation and regulatory policies at the state and national levels; researching and reporting on safety concerns and best business practices; and providing four yearly forums to advance and discuss member issues. Throughout this year’s conference, we participated in committee meetings, education sessions, and presentations, while also attending the products fair and networking with other top names in the business.

After reflecting on our time at SC&RA 2017, two of our top takeaways were about what makes a great leader, and the value of sharing business challenges among peers.

You can’t lead without these 5 qualities.

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This year’s keynote speaker was Captain Paul Bucha, a Vietnam War hero who received a Medal of Honor. Captain Bucha spoke of the challenges leaders face, and shared some of his own personal experiences. He left us with five key qualities necessary for great leadership: integrity, compassion, competency, confidence and humility. These qualities really resonated with us, as we would not be serving you for 125 years if we didn’t live and breathe them every day.

Discussing challenges with peers makes both of you better.

In addition to the impressive keynote presentation, we attended committee meetings for crane and rigging safety, transportation safety training, permit policy, insurance and risk management, and many more. We found each of these sessions extremely valuable, as we had the opportunity to learn from other members by discussing challenges that we all face, so that we can find ways to improve to our businesses and services.

What do you find to be most valuable when attending conferences in your industry? Let us know in the comments!

 

 

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No Boiler Too Complex for Boulter

RDH9A mechanical contractor came to us looking for assistance with a boiler replacement job, complete with new catwalks, rails and access ladders, for Rochester District Heating. Boiler replacements are typically complex projects, but this particular project was especially challenging since we were working against aggressive time constraints and the project had multiple components. Our customer’s goal was a safer, more effective boiler system. The challenge? Deliver a safe and secure system, on time and on budget.

 What was our pathway to success?

RDH3In order to successfully meet our customer’s timeline, we carefully scheduled each component so that our processes would coordinate with the demolition. And because we uniquely offer all the needed services under one roof, we were able to complete the project on time and on budget. It all comes down to the Boulter promise of creating the product that our customer needs.

Our OSHA-trained crews and Qualified Riggers can safely install any machinery with ease. Our expert personnel were able to complete this job quickly, on time, and ultimately deliver the safe and secure system that our customer needed.

 How did it all come together?RDH5

The end result was exceptional. Our customers were thrilled because despite the complexity of the project, there have been no injuries onsite. We implemented the appropriate measures so that their employees can do their jobs safely, and the system could be prepared to supply heat before the cold weather hit. Thanks to their new Boulter support steel, handrail, access ladders and updated grating, Rochester District Heating was able to get back to business.

Visit our Project Gallery to find out more about other types of jobs we’ve done in the past.

How Boulter Sets the Safety Standard

“Safety first, never last. Have a future, not a past.” That’s the motto our friends at York Safety Solutions shared with us at our annual safety day training this year. The entire Boulter team got together to talk about this top priority.scene 3 - rigging1

In the weeks leading up to the meeting, York employees visited several of our jobsites and then gathered their findings into inspection reports to share.

That went great. It was a mutual feeling all around: they aren’t your typical “gotcha” guys. More like partners. They collaborated with our leadership, project managers, and guys on the ground to make the presentation about content that actually mattered to us.

Everyone agrees. It’s always nice to have someone come in and refresh us. Each time you hear it, it sticks in your head even more. 

TieoffWhy do we have ongoing safety training?

 We believe that safety is everyone’s responsibility. And we take that belief very seriously, proven by our employees working 90,000+ hours with no major accidents.

It helps that all field employees have a minimum of 10-hours of OSHA training, and foremen, like Matt Levick, have at least 30 hours. But, Boulter is about so much more than the minimum safety standards. According to Matt:

 “As Union guys, we’re always properly trained. Everyone goes through a four-year apprenticeship where we’re taught safety for our trades before we even begin to work.”scene5 -steelfab2

Matt recalls his apprenticeship and how he learned the ins and outs of the work. Not just
how to do it, but how to do it safely. And it pays off. Matt says it best:

“If you look at our vehicles, hear about our referrals, and see our careful workmanship, you’ll recognize how Boulter has set the standards in terms of safety. We are the ones everyone follows.”

Want to learn more about safety at Boulter? Click here.

Western New York’s Sonar Test Facility

Did you know the Navy does field tests in the Finger Lakes?

Our glacier-made lakes are perfect for the research and development the facility conducts, which is world-renowned for ventures that demand deep-water testing. Because it is capable of handling systems, or equipment, weighing up to 200 tons and as deep as 500 feet, many major projects get evaluated there. Also, the facility performs test and evaluation of equipment ranging from single element transducers to complex sonar arrays and systems.

Bsonaroulter was brought in by O’Connell Electric to assist in the replacement of the Test Facility’s entire ship-mounted MV and LV distribution systems. We received all the equipment, rig materials from land to the barge via crane, from the barge to the ship via the Navy’s ship-mounted crane. Once everything was on the ship, our crew rigged the equipment into its final location and the materials into place.

Our Fabrication Shop fabricated and installed new stainless steel bases for the exterior equipment. We also fabricated new stainless steel handrails to replace the existing fencing.

 

Learn more about typical projects we undertake here or read what others are saying about us.

[Adapted from the O’Connell Electric Newsletter, Winter/Spring 2015/2016]

 

#TBT: Rigging the Safari Bus at the Seneca Park Zoo Africa Exhibit

Rochester’s Seneca Park Zoo is a popular recreational destination. It also seems like the last place where Boulter Industrial Contractors, Inc would be contracted for a rigging job, right?

Unveiled in May 2012, the Step Into Africa attraction boasted a state-of-the art exhibit featuring three African lions. One of the features of the exhibit includes a stationary safari bus where visitors can view the lions.

To install the safari bus, the Zoo needed someone who specializes in rigging and custom installation projects. That’s where Boulter comes into play.Photos 007

IMG_0353The zoo purchased the two-story double decker bus and had it delivered to the site. At that point, Boulter’s field workers assessed the task and they fabricated steel on site to cradle the bus for safe hoisting with a crane. With the use of rigging slings and chain falls for adjustment, the bus was raised and swung into place. Once the bus was aligned and landed, ironworkers welded it to steel embedment plates in the concrete piers at the buses final location.

“This job was a lot of fun,” says Jeffrey Smith, Project Manager. “I remember it drawing a crowd of people curious to see what we were doing.”IMG_0352

Four years later, the exhibit is still a patron favorite. “As a local business, I am proud to see what a positive impact a job like this makes on our community,” says William S. Boulter, President and CEO of Boulter.

While many of Boulter’s projects are behind the scenes or out of public view, Jeffrey mentions “It’s neat when my kids say, ‘my dad put that bus there’ whenever we go to the zoo.”

To learn more about Boulter and its services, visit our website.

 

*Project photos courtesy of Seneca Park Zoo

Bridge Maintenance on the Union Street Overpass in Monroe County

Boulter’s crew has been onsite in the town of Chili removing the steel beams of the Union Street Bridge over I-90.

According to a press release issued by the New York State Thruway Authority, the “work will incorporate a full replacement of the existing structure.” Boulter was contracted by this project to remove the 12 ton steel beams. Using our 15-ton fork truck, beams were secured to the forks in order to allow them to be cut from the structure.

The Union Street overpass is located between Wheatland Center Road in the town of Wheatland and Chili-Scottsville Road (New York State Route 386) in the Town of Chili. With the bridge under construction, motorists have been advised of detour routes to follow. The new bridge is expected to reopen in the fall of 2016.

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Read about other projects Boulter frequently undertakes.

Learn more about Boulter and request a quote with absolutely no obligation.

Heavy Lifting… Crane Work on a Crisp Autumn Day

2 cranesThere’s nothing Boulter enjoys more than lifting large, heavy objects. Since we have been in this business for over 120 years, we have learned a thing or two about the most efficient and safest ways to install machinery and equipment. So setting three 65-foot hot water silo’s, each weighing approximately 21 tons (42,000 lbs), is all in a day’s work.

Each silo was delivered to site and our crew went to work with the necessary rigging to hoist and trip the tanks into the upright position using two cranes. For this job we used a 350-ton capacity crane as well as our 75-ton mobile truck crane.1404
Multiple pipe connections in various locations on each silo means that placement is critical. Using the customers supplied drawing, our crew went through the process of measuring and snapping chalk lines to layout each individual silo destination.

Directed by our certified signalman, the crane hoisted each silo across the work area to the landing point where our team guided and landed them in position.

In this case, 12 epoxy anchors were required by the manufacturer to secure each silo in place on the concrete slab. With the use of a hand held core drilling machine, the installation was completed by securing the anchors and hold down blocks.

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One Crane, Two Forklifts, and a 30,000 Pound Machine: Rigging the Boulter Way

There is a certain finesse required to complete a rigging job in the highest quality possible.  Manufacturing machines aren’t simple moves either: they’re bulky and oddly-shaped.  But those large, heavy machines are a huge investment to our clients; therefore, we take extra precautions to make sure the job is done correctly and with the highest caliber work possible.

To give you a better idea of what’s involved, one of yesterday’s rigging jobs called for two forklifts and one crane to unload and move a 30,000 pound machine.  After lifting the crate off the truck bed, our employees went to work disassembling the crate and unpacking the cargo.job 8.5

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Then they used the Hyster 15-Ton to move it closer to the crane for offloading from the skid.

Finally, all that was left was to move it into the shop.20150805_113717

Does your company have something impossibly heavy to move? Give us a call… we make the impossible possible! 

Visit our website: http://www.boulter1.com